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    Setting an Example

    April 16th, 2011

    Setting the Example means that your life is transparent and unified. We can define leadership as a property of the group, and is the act of influencing a group to achieve its goals that defines a leader. Setting an Example is one of the key ways we have of ensuring culture, respect and genuine loyalty.

    While a very simple act on the face of it, none is more important. If you fail to demonstrate this act to your people be that family, employees, customers and the like you will succumb to the potential of negative results. No matter how good your talk is, if you don’t match it with your walk, you will earn no respect and find it increasingly difficult to get results.

    Setting an Example is where you show your values. When you demonstrate values, and that your character has integrity, that is, if who you are the same person all the time then you will accomplish far more than you might imagine. For this kind of leader, they have those actions returned in kind and in results.

    It may be more difficult under some circumstances to set a positive example, but that shouldn’t stop you! Setting an Example is where your actions are centric to your values.

    When you constantly set an  example, you will get the results you want as a leader.


    2011 An Accountable Year

    January 1st, 2011

    The first days of the New Year have always been a time for looking back to the past, and more importantly, forward to the coming year. It’s a time to reflect on the changes we want (or need) to make and resolve to follow through on those changes. 

    There are countless different ways to make resolutions and change.

    I would strongly recommend you take time to write a letter to your future self.

    Doing this exercise is a very insightful experience. Just imagine writing a letter to yourself based on 1 year from now, then opening it at that exact moment 1 year from now to see how much of it you achieved. Writing your Dear Me letter helps crystallize exactly how you anticipate yourself to become over the next 12 month period. 

    At the very moment you are writing your letter, your conscious is captured and stored within the words. Upon opening your letter you get to compare your writings with reality. What was really important to you will have been remembered and achieved. The letter lets you see in totality how much things have changed over the past 12 months – in itself this is an intriguing experience. It’s interesting to just see how much you have grown/changed since you wrote the letter.

    No longer will a Year just drift and unaccountable.

    You begin by writing Dear Carey (in my case) and summarising the year that has just past. An honest assessment of how you saw the year through your eyes.

    Then select your headings – mine are:

                Family            Health            Work            Financial  

    The writings should be totally written to yourself describing what you want to achieve in your selected headings.

    The writing should not be over 2 pages.

    Once you have completed your writing sit quietly and read over them a minimum of 5 times.

    Then it is time to seal up your letter and either place in a secure area or give your letter to a trusted friend to be handed or posted back at year end.

    I know many people who now write a personal letter to themselves every year. It has made a consistent change process for me with a path to follow.

    I am more than happy to provide help with your personal letter or to hold any letters in safe keeping. 

    For more information of goal setting please visit Dwayne Alexander web site at

    http://www.livemygoals.com/

    My best wishes to you for a successful 2011 and beyond.


    Kiwi Nation Interview on Kiwi FM

    December 9th, 2010

    Recently I was interviewed on Kiwi Nation for a series of interviews about Leaders who run businesses in New Zealand. It was played on Kiwi FM last week.

    KiwiNation is an audio and video podcast of conversations with interesting and inspirational New Zealanders. Hosted by Glenn Williams from wammo.co.nz and Ben Young from bwagy.com, the aim is to expose stories and inspire not only Kiwis but also the rest of the world. Jump in a take a look around our KiwiNation! The first season contains 4 episodes which are released weekly. In 2011 Season 2 will be released.


    Environmental Change

    October 9th, 2010

    On a global scale we understand what is meant by environmental change.  It requires all of us to be conscious and to play a small role together which makes a big impact collectively.

    In the industry that I work in salespeople have an environment choice.  They work on commission only and so unlike any other industry there are always jobs available in real estate, it is just a matter of where and who with.  In business leaders have a certain degree of attraction and people join individuals first, but they also look at the environment around them – where are they going to be spending the majority of their working hours and how will it impact on their ability to maximise their own personal productivity?  I see many real estate offices, a better description would be real estate office environments.  Some are very good, some are average and some are tired and lack energy.

    If you can make an environmental change to your business it can be done in such a small way, positive livery, ensuring significant light into your work areas and having where possible a reception area that reflects the standards of your business.  I thought about this because recently I was in a real estate office that was tired and a customer came in and was looking at the displays and you could see them looking around and making a visual judgement on this business, then they walked out.  The environment of that real estate office was not friendly and was due for a business environmental change.

    What small changes can you make in your business to make it environmentally attractive and productive?


    The Climb Must Never Stop

    July 22nd, 2010

    I can confirm that you go quicker downhill than you do going up. I am at the Inman Conference in San Francisco. A quantum leap for me in my understanding of our industry business aligned with its compatibility to technology. Opinions divided but acceptance of direction is universal.

    I also find myself with an opportunity to walk the streets of a new destination in the City previously unknown to me. I was up and away early this morning on a walk that was first searched on Google – seemed appropriate to do that considering it has been the most discussed topic here. What is San Francisco famous for? – The Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz. Could I potentially see both at the same time? San Francisco has some of the steepest streets in the world so what did I search? “List of the steepest streets to see Alcatraz and the Golden Gate Bridge”. It came up with the 10 steepest streets in San Francisco.  I chose the 5th steepest.

    A quick insight in the Golden Gate Bridge that we heard yesterday by the host of Inman – When the bridge was built the men knew there was a safety net below they stated that the ‘safety net’ increased productivity but 30%. It also has the highest rate of suicide in the world one person every week. With no safety net the consequences are known.

    The street I walked up was steep in any language – and as I climb it was thinking about the view that hopefully I would see from the top. My slow steps however were a testament of the climb to the top it was hard work. I made it – The view from the top was exhilarating. The Golden Gate Bridge to my right and Alcatraz straight ahead. I reflected. The view at the top is much different to the few even 10 steps before. You must make the top to achieve the view. But I then began to wonder about the No 1 steepest street. A flash of ‘think again’ came over me. Why would you necessary get the best view at the steepest street in San Francisco? Maybe the highest but that doesn’t mean the steepest.

    The business I lead is No 2 in the industry. I do not get to see the view from the top in our business or industry. I am surrounded by those who do. The language at the top is different to the language I use. The business leaders at the top have walked up the hill. They know the you go down quicker when you are the top than when you are still on the climb.

    We could do this – We must do this.

    We should do this – We will do this.

    The dream position must be to reach your capacity but be forever testing it and create room to take another step up the hill of momentum.

    The climb must never stop.